Can Animals Understand Humans?


62% of people claim that their pets understand
what they say. Whether or not animals can hear, recognise and possibly even understand
what humans say, has always been a profound mystery. Recent evidence attempts to reveal,
once and for all, whether Tony the terrier knows the difference between “good boy”
and “Tony, did you chew my slippers?” Dogs may respond to these sentences, but do
dogs and other animals actually understand the meaning behind those sentences? Or are
they just well-trained? You may be very surprised by what you’re about to discover about animal
perception. In 1984, researchers at the National Marine
Mammal Foundation in California noticed something quite unusual. They claimed that they heard
voices of people talking around an enclosure where they kept a Beluga whale named NOC.
They were fairly certain it wasn’t anything paranormal, after all the voices sounded so…
real. Eventually a diver was in NOC’s tank and he noticed the strangest thing. NOC, the
Beluga whale, was talking to him, in an eerily human-like voice. Incredibly, the whale reportedly
told the diver to “get out”. This is an actual recording of NOC imitating
human speech. Kinda sounds like a human talking through a kazoo, doesn’t it? That’s because
unlike humans who use their larynx, whales use their nasal tract to produce sounds, making
everything sound all nasally. It’s believed that NOC, having lived most of his life in
close proximity to humans, learnt to mimic the human voice. But the real question is,
was NOC merely repeating noises he picked up from humans, or did he actually understand
the meaning behind what he was saying? Asian elephants, seals and parrots have also been
known to imitate human speech, but do they understand what they are saying? And do they
understand what we say to them? In 1891 a German high school mathematics teacher
named Wilhelm Von Osten convinced himself that animals could be taught basic mathematics.
He tried to teach maths to a cat, a horse and a bear. The cat couldn’t care less and
was only interested in itself, the bear was just downright hostile towards him but the
horse showed great promise. After extensive tutelage, the horse, named Hans, learnt to
tap his hoof in response to numbers Von Osten wrote on his blackboard. If Von Osten wrote
the number two, Hans would tap his hoof twice, if he wrote four, Hans would tap four times,
and so on. Spurred on by this success, Von Osten proceeded to teach Hans to answer basic
mathematical equations. Von Osten would write on the blackboard “2 + 2=” and Hans would
tap his hoof four times. Von Osten was delighted and exhibited Hans to the public all over
Germany. During these shows, which Von Osten never
charged admission for, the crowd were awe-stricken as Hans correctly answered an array of basic
maths equations by using his hoof to tap out the answers. Hans could add, subtract, multiply,
divide and even work out the square root of a number. Hans would correctly answer around
89% of the questions. The news of “Hans the genius horse” rapidly spread across
Germany. But along with Hans’ fame came critics and skeptics. A psychologist, Oskar
Pfungst asked to do some experiments with Hans, to which Von Osten agreed. Oskar Pfungst erected a large tent to perform
the experiments in, to eradicate the possibility of Hans being influenced by outside stimuli.
As a control test, Pfungst asked Von Osten to step inside the tent and ask Hans mathematical
questions like he usually does. As expected, Hans got most of the questions correct. However,
Pfungst then asked Von Osten to move a little farther away from Hans whilst he asked the
questions and subsequently, Hans got far fewer answers correct. Finally, Pfungst told Von Osten to ask Hans
questions that he knew Von Osten did not know the answer to. When Von Osten asked these
questions, the accuracy of Hans’ answers fell to almost zero. It appeared that in order
for Hans to get the answer correct, the person asking the question, had to know the answer
to the question also. These results were very strange, but incredibly interesting, so Pfungst
investigated further. He observed Von Osten’s facial expressions
and posture whilst he was asking the questions. Pfungst noticed Von Osten’s facial expression
and posture change, right after he asked a question. His face and posture would tense
up in expectation of Hans’ answer. However, each time Hans tapped his hoof and got closer
to the correct answer, Von Osten would relax slightly and his posture, expressions and
mannerisms would change. As soon as Hans tapped his hoof enough times so that he had reached
the correct answer, Von Osten’s posture and expressions would relax and become happier,
because he was relieved that Hans had seemingly arrived at the correct answer, all by himself. It transpired that the horse was receiving
small visual clues that acted as feedback. The horse would start tapping as soon as he
observed Von Osten asking the question and then tensing up. When the tension had alleviated
from Von Osten’s face, Hans would stop tapping his hoof. Hans was never actually doing any
mathematics; he was simply well attuned to his owner’s visual clues. Von Osten was
shocked at this revelation, because he was completely unaware that he was providing Hans
with these unconscious visual clues. He genuinely thought his horse was a genius. The results of Pfungst’s experiment had
enormous effects on how all scientific experiments would be carried out in the future. This phenomenon
came to be known as “The Clever Hans Effect”. The Clever Hans Effect, as we know it today,
is when an experimenter unwittingly alters the results of an experiment, simply because
he or she is expecting a certain result. The simple expectation for something to happen,
can have huge consequences on an experiment’s results, without the experimenter even realising
it. These days, necessary measures are taken when
working with both animals and humans to prevent the Clever Hans effect from altering the results
of experiments. A border collie named Rico came into the spotlight in 2004 after being
intensively studied by animal psychologists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary
Anthropology in Germany. The researchers showed such a great interest in Rico because his
owners reported that he could understand over 200 words. A feat previously unheard of in
the canine kingdom. To test whether Rico’s skills were a bunch of fluff or a truly bone-a-fide
talent, the researchers set up an experiment. The researchers arranged 200 toys on the floor
in a room adjacent to were Rico was being held, they did this ten toys at a time. Each
toy had a unique name, such as “fluffy” or “squeezy”; Rico’s owner had already
trained him to remember the name of each toy. Each time the researchers let Rico into the
room with the toys and asked Rico to fetch a toy, then another toy and another. Until
Rico had fetched all 10 toys. Whilst the researchers were issuing commands to Rico, they stayed
on the other side of a dividing wall, where Rico could hear them but not see them, to
eliminate the Clever Hans effect. In total, Rico successfully remembered and retrieved
93% of the toys. Impressive, but this was only a test of Rico’s
memory, not his cognitive function – ie. his ability to use logic and inference, just
like a human. So the researchers did a second experiment. They arranged seven items in the
room with an eight item which was brand new, which they gave a unique name to. Rico had
never seen or heard the name of this new item before. Amazingly when Rico was let into the
room and asked to fetch the new item, he was very quickly able to infer which was the new
toy and fetched it straight away. Rico seemingly used a process of deduction and elimination.
This is called “fast mapping”, a process where one is able to quickly learn a new concept
after a single exposure to brand new information. Human toddlers do this all the time, it’s
how they learn. Even more amazingly Rico was able to fetch
the new toys again, four weeks later, having only seen them once. Out of the six new items
that Rico was shown, four weeks prior, he remembered three of them, four weeks later.
Interestingly three out of six is the same rate at which adult humans are able to remember
things that they saw four weeks ago. Chaser is another border collie who can reportedly
remember the name of 1,000 toys and can retrieve each one of them, just like Rico. But Chaser
has another unique talent. She is able to recognise verbs. From a young age Chaser’s
owner, a retired psychologist, trained Chaser to understand and utilise three verbs: nose,
paw and fetch. When Chaser’s owner says “paw slinky”, Chaser will go over to the
toy named slinky and put her paw on it. Similarly, if “nose slinky” is said, Chaser will
put her nose on the slinky toy and when “fetch slinky” is said, Chaser will fetch the toy. Chaser’s owner is able to swap the verb
and the name of the toy for any one of 1,000 different toys and Chaser will go over to
the correct toy and do the correct action almost one hundred percent of the time. That’s
about the same cognitive ability as a three-year-old human child. This also demonstrates something
astonishing. Chaser doesn’t simply remember each and every command, it’s not just a
cheap memory trick. Chaser’s brain is actually using cognitive function to determine what
to do in each given situation. This is no different to how a human brain works. Although this is rather basic stuff for an
adult human. It’s an amazing display of cognitive ability and logical inference for
an animal. It demonstrates that dogs understand what we say, provided they are given the opportunity
to learn these human-like concepts as a puppy. But that’s not different from a human, human’s
have to learn this stuff too, we aren’t born knowing what “go get daddy a beer”
means. As a baby we learn the individual words that construct that sentence and then as a
toddler, we use our brain’s cognitive ability, especially our fast mapping ability, to know
what we should do when those words are arranged into that sentence. Just like Chaser is doing. Dog’s aren’t able to learn as fast or
to the same extent as humans, so realistically their ability is capped compared to a human.
However, provided they are given the correct education and training from an early age,
dogs most definitely can understand at least a small percentage of what you say to them. So when you say “time for ‘walkies’”
and your dog goes freaking mental. It may not just be because they have associated the
word “walkies” with running about outside with their beloved owner; there’s actually
some very basic level of understanding there. But don’t think you can go and have full-blown,
esoteric conversations with your canine buddy. They may understand the odd word or two, but
first and foremost, dogs use smell, to communicate and differentiate between objects and people.
They’re going to understand a lot more of what you’re trying to communicate to then,
if you roll around in the garden for ten minutes then let them sniff you, than if you try to
explain to them why you had such a bad day at work. But so far we’ve only talked about dogs,
horses and whales, what about other animals? After all the spectrum of animal cognition
spans the entire animal kingdom. Take Koko the gorilla for example. Koko is
a female gorilla who has learnt a modified version of American Sign Language. Koko was
taught from an early age and now, she can reportedly understand and use 1,000 different
signs of what her trainer calls “Gorilla Sign Language” and she understands over
2,000 words of spoken English. Naturally Koko has been the subject of numerous scientific
studies, articles and books. But whether or not Koko actually understands
sign language in the same way a human does, is a topic of hot debate. Some researchers
argue that Koko hasn’t actually mastered sign language at all and she doesn’t understand
the words she is signing. They insist that Koko’s human-like sign language abilities
are a result of operant conditioning. Operant conditioning is when someone learns to do
something because there’s a reward at the end of it. For example, if you showed a toddler
three different coloured boxes, blue, green and red and placed a sweet in the green box
– the toddler would then learn to always open the green box in the future, in order to get
the sweet. Koko may have simply learnt to make certain
shapes and signs with her hands because she is rewarded for doing so. Video evidence showed
that Koko was also being influenced by the Clever Hans effect. Her trainers were giving
her unconscious facial clues to prompt her to make certain gestures with her hands. Despite all this, Koko’s trainers are adamant
that there’s more going on in Koko’s head than researchers give her credit for. One
piece of evidence which suggests a greater level of cognition in Koko’s brain, occurred
when Koko’s baby was taken away from her. The day after her baby was removed, she reportedly
signed the word “baby” to her keeper. This is known as displacement, the ability
to talk about objects that are not currently present in the room and it’s something that
we thought was unique to humans and it’s very rarely observed in the animal kingdom. Also, Koko has been known to talk about new
objects that she hasn’t even been taught how to sign. For example, Koko has never been
taught the sign language for the the word “ring”. But Koko combined the signs for
“finger” and “bracelet” to refer to a ring. If you think about it, a ring is just
a tiny bracelet for your finger, that’s pretty smart going Koko. Events such as this
suggest that Koko has a higher level of understanding of the words she is actually signing. But there’s a dark side that comes with
so much gorilla intelligence. Koko enjoys seeing human nipples and she often asks her
female caregivers using sign language, to show her their nipples. This unusual behavior
actually resulted in a sexual harassment lawsuit by one of Koko’s female caregivers in 2005.
Maybe it’s not such a good idea we try to communicate with animals. Dolphins are often said to be one of the smartest
animals in the world and they certainly proved it in a 1984 study. Two bottlenose dolphins
were taught human language. The first dolphin named Phoenix was taught how to comprehend
human speech. The second dolphin, Akeakamai, was taught a form of sign language. Both dolphins
were taught a large variety of words, such as object names, actions and object modifiers.
All of which could be combined and rearranged into hundreds of unique sentences to form
a command. For example, “swim to the blue ring” or
“pick up the red ring”. The commands were given to the dolphins using computed generated
voices and videos, to prevent the Clever Hans effect. Both dolphins were able to comprehend
and execute the given commands at a much higher success rate than what would be considered
chance. Understanding words and simple one-word commands is one thing. But for an animal to
understand complex three-to-five word commands and accurately follow them, is quite simply,
astonishing. Experiments such as these prove that many
animals have an unprecedented level of understanding of human speech and communication. Up to now
we’ve only explored a minute fraction of intellect within the animal kingdom, who knows
what some animals are really capable of. A real life planet of the apes may be just around
the corner. But until then you should probably watch what you’re saying around your pets.
They may be listening a bit more attentively than you think.

100 Comments

  1. Alfredo Alfredington said:

    Think about it, Noc is underwater when he hears people. He's not mimicking the human voice as we hear it, he's mimicking it as he hears it. That's a human voice from underwater.

    October 11, 2019
    Reply
  2. Alfredo Alfredington said:

    My dog somehow knows what we're talking about when we dance around the word "walk" so he doesn't freak out. He starts getting excited.

    October 11, 2019
    Reply
  3. Internet Junkie said:

    In the eyes of cats all you are is a source of catnip ,food and shelter.

    October 12, 2019
    Reply
  4. Daniel Martinez said:

    Dude. We don't even know if humans understand humans.

    October 12, 2019
    Reply
  5. CasualScrub said:

    When you can't even pronounce your own channel's name properly, I'm out.

    October 12, 2019
    Reply
  6. Void Lord said:

    This sounds fake

    October 12, 2019
    Reply
  7. Regrettable-Username said:

    Rest in peace Coco 💔

    October 12, 2019
    Reply
  8. Philip Turner said:

    Show me your willy

    October 12, 2019
    Reply
  9. Raymond Davis said:

    ou should look at the experiment out of MIT in which they raised an African Grey Parrot speaking to it an teaching it as you might a human child .They deduced it's vocabulary and comprehension was on the same level as a two year old.
    Oh and you are very wrong about KOKO. When she saw her friend Robin Williams on TV she asked her trainer about why. When she found out he had died she was grief stricken and became despondent and mourned him for some time.

    October 13, 2019
    Reply
  10. Honkpilled Honkkler said:

    "learns human language"
    "asks caretakers to show nipples"
    That Gorilla is legendary! 😂😂😂😂

    October 13, 2019
    Reply
  11. F DA MAN said:

    Sexual harassment give me a fucking break I'll be glad when feminists go extinct. That would definitely make the world a better place.

    October 13, 2019
    Reply
  12. lactosis- -undefined said:

    If we didn't train humans to understand words, they would not understand them either.

    October 13, 2019
    Reply
  13. Sir Prize said:

    When a horse is better at math than me.

    October 15, 2019
    Reply
  14. Thomas Armer said:

    My wife understands EVERYTHING I say.

    October 15, 2019
    Reply
  15. oof OoF said:

    Every time I touch The front door my cat comes running

    October 16, 2019
    Reply
  16. Boris B said:

    Never thought of words like nose and paw as verbs before.

    October 16, 2019
    Reply
  17. Geoffrey Florence said:

    With my current dog, I realized at some point that I could use natural langage with her : I mean, she didn’t just recognize keywords. I could basically use any combination of words and she would understand what I mean. And I absolutely never taught her. Likewise, when the oven’s timer rings, or when the water for pastas boils, she comes to warn me, and once again I never taught her that.

    I don’t know about wild animals, but pets that have lived at our sides for decades or even centuries probably have learned to understand us at many levels – just like with the Clever Hans story.

    October 17, 2019
    Reply
  18. Chris Shawn said:

    Animals are far more intelligent than humans give them credit. Instead of trying to understand this reality the human is more interested in coming up bogus evidence of the contrary. Arrogant, narcissist humans have a lot of evolving to do.

    October 17, 2019
    Reply
  19. nashville slim said:

    Let's be real beluga whales are smarter than all humans. Belugas don't have thumbs that's why humans slaughter them every day. Happy ending no.

    October 18, 2019
    Reply
  20. Culvea Solvere said:

    Animals like cats and dogs have a human intelligence of a 3-4 yo child.
    It's also been proven that dogs and cats will know the moment that their beloved human is on their way home 100% of the time without the use of their car.

    October 18, 2019
    Reply
  21. John homes said:

    I had two cats for 17 years they were smarter than most millennials

    October 18, 2019
    Reply
  22. kdrazalot G-USA said:

    Well, I don’t know if they know what they are saying, but I heard from Cat experts that Cats can learn about 20-25 words, and I really think my cat knows what i mean when I say “Just a minute” She always will wait for me to come back! lol and…have you ever seen an elephant paint pictures? They can, and do!

    October 20, 2019
    Reply
  23. dwayne fien said:

    you forgot to mention octopi. those guys are scary smart.. 10 to 20 million more years of evolution and the could be like the Steven King "puppet Masters"

    October 21, 2019
    Reply
  24. Potato said:

    So my hamster was doing hamster stuff and i gave em his food and i said EAAAAAT UP it ate right away.

    October 21, 2019
    Reply
  25. Nema Katt said:

    Animals definitely understand humans. I told my puppy not to pee in my bed. He never peed in the house again. 🤷🏾‍♀️

    October 21, 2019
    Reply
  26. The cocker spaniel said:

    I haven’t seen you for years

    October 21, 2019
    Reply
  27. Howard Ackerman said:

    Koko being like tits or GTFO kind disproves the sexuality for boobs being a social construct thing.

    October 22, 2019
    Reply
  28. M said:

    I call my dog stinky when he sits by me and he goes and lays somewhere else lol

    October 22, 2019
    Reply
  29. Corey Brown Gaming with commentary said:

    What if cats can talk but dont enough of a shit to do so towards people

    October 23, 2019
    Reply
  30. Midnightx user Midnightxuser said:

    🎩When dogs grow thumbs, we are in big big trouble.🙃

    October 23, 2019
    Reply
  31. Kentō said:

    15:40 "1984 study"
    Big Brother intensifies

    October 23, 2019
    Reply
  32. Pomponivs Archibald said:

    I think there's a possibility that Koko was interested in seeing female workers' nipples to make sure they were female and not "human silverbacks", kind of like being reassured they could be friends

    October 23, 2019
    Reply
  33. Vortex said:

    The whale told the diver to "get out"
    plays recording
    Glbblgbldleoh gkfbg filgpogggbgpgbg!

    October 23, 2019
    Reply
  34. Stained Brain said:

    Their was a lady who worked with an African Grey parrot for many many years.. after a while he asked what color he was. He was self aware.. crazy.

    October 24, 2019
    Reply
  35. Iconoclast said:

    Many researchers diminish the cognitive abilities of other animals as but a means of getting or attempting to get what they want, actually they are 100% right, unfortunately what they fail to grasp is that this is all human language and other form of our communications are all about!

    October 25, 2019
    Reply
  36. Jessamyn Anderson said:

    What are you talking about? I have full blown conversations with my dog all the time!

    October 25, 2019
    Reply
  37. samantha tang said:

    do bee understand words? do ants, do rats?

    October 25, 2019
    Reply
  38. Android Gear said:

    Technically humans are animals so animals are smart

    October 25, 2019
    Reply
  39. SkyTech RTS said:

    I bet that cat knew how to do like quadratic expressions but just didn't give a damn and blew the scientists off.

    October 25, 2019
    Reply
  40. james roberson said:

    My cat really listens maybee the Hans affect !

    October 26, 2019
    Reply
  41. J Eastwood said:

    Well, I remember when I was young , when the family dog was hungry , he'd bring has paper plate in and drop it at my feet when I was sitting in the dining or livingroom. One day my mother was sitting with me and we teased him by talking to one another… WHAT DOE HE WANT? …I HAVE NO IDEA… He looked at her and then at me and picked the plate up and dropped it on the floor with a firm paw going down on it and, with his throat, he said I WANT!!! … That was the FIRST time …

    I had a Beagle that I had ESP with all his life, which is how I came to him to begin with. If he barked that he needed something, I'd look out at him or picture him . Somehow, I would understand what he wanted. I'd 'tell 'him to stop barking, lay down and I'd bring him whatever it was. He'd stop barking and go lay down…. But the first time I really knew we were doing that was when he was in the yard and got his rope tangled through two bushes. I could see how it was tangled and, pictured him doing it, and gave him hand motions as to what to do to get untangled. He stood there fixed on me and then went and untangled the rope. … Many times after that, this is how we "spoke" to one another, for 13 years.

    October 26, 2019
    Reply
  42. Patrick Star said:

    I do indeed believe that dogs can understand us, last time i asked my dog if she wanted a cookie she responded with "My dear man, indeed i would like to have a snack"

    October 27, 2019
    Reply
  43. Mountain Mamma said:

    Dog meat taste good

    October 27, 2019
    Reply
  44. Angel said:

    Could've answered and explain the question in 1 min but you decided to talk shit for 17mins 👎👎👎🤦

    October 28, 2019
    Reply
  45. OOZiTen said:

    He’s the British Malcolm in the middle

    October 28, 2019
    Reply
  46. Our Sovereignty said:

    this is just bootleg vsauce

    October 28, 2019
    Reply
  47. Durrpadil said:

    The answer is an overwhelming yes. One time I met a complete stranger of a dog. He kept watching me as I was on lunch break. I wasn't fully relaxed… Until I let out the biggest yawn and stretch. This complete stranger did the exact same thing. At that moment we bonded and were truly relaxed. They read our body language and emotions so well.

    October 28, 2019
    Reply
  48. Kaileta Liyienn said:

    OMG………..

    It looked so good I thought it was electric!

    October 28, 2019
    Reply
  49. James Middleton said:

    why the fuck would anyone sue a monkey, what does it achieve? you can't take money from a monkey you don't need a restraining order to something that lives in a cage, what does the lawsuit say. I'm actually really interested now

    October 28, 2019
    Reply
  50. Joe Mummerth said:

    crows , parrots ,and dogs have been proven to understand simple math problems , and it has been determined that the average dog understands as many as 250 words ! so , yeah some animals do understand human language ! of course if you are speaking japanese to a dog raised by english speakers , you get the same reaction you would from a human english speaker hearing japanese for the first time !

    October 28, 2019
    Reply
  51. NANCOK said:

    I always saw animals as having the understanding of a 2 y/o, they understand queues and are motivated by feedback
    So they have no idea what "good boy" means, but when they see you looking happy and they are unusually well treated as they hear the word they understand it means happines for you and him

    October 29, 2019
    Reply
  52. ceu160193 said:

    Animals often can understand emotional tone behind phrase, without understanding phrase itself. So, for example, if parrot hears someone swearing, parrot will repeat it whenever it's in distress.

    October 29, 2019
    Reply
  53. Neo-Eye said:

    there are millions of pets in the world probably so to most of earths population its no mystery

    October 30, 2019
    Reply
  54. Cartoon cool stuff said:

    Koko: send me nudes

    October 31, 2019
    Reply
  55. Čezarė Bordžija said:

    My cats learn from me random things that I don’t want them to know. They watch how I open cabinets, fridge, they remember what stuff I put in a trash bin, how I turn on TV, and computer (once one of them sat on a keyboard and created a playlist of songs that remind me of my ex… CAUSE few days before I was crying) , how I use faucets and even washing machine (once she decided to CHANGE SETTINGS so it would finish washing faster and rise heat of the water!)… They even EAT with their front paws because they WATCHED how I eat candies or cookies with hands. 🤦🏻‍♂️ They know where I keep things they like and even after MONTHS they still remember where I put these things. 🤦🏻‍♂️ They also understand my all emotions: if I cry they come to lick my tears, if I am sad they start kneading me, if I am happy they make F-1 race at home…. And when my ex FIRST time came in my home- one cat started attacking him ‘cause SHE SAW AND KNEW I was crying for months about that fuckboy and she KNEW what she had to do….while another decided to befriend him as a revenge on ME that I forbade her to open a bookshelf’s door MONTHS AGO. 😒 And one evening I left my phone unlocked…some of them managed to call my aunt in Spain on Viber! 🤦🏻‍♂️ She thought I called her because she found a missed call! I just can’t leave my phone unwatched… When they were little they learned that tapping on screen make selfies and while I was cooking dinner they managed to do an entire photoshoot on the bed. 🤦🏻‍♂️

    I really hope they will not start speaking some time soon ‘cause they know too much. 😂 So now I go to bed and HOPE they’ll not turn on water in the bathroom. 😂

    October 31, 2019
    Reply
  56. Sam Maloney said:

    Fantastic content as always mate!

    October 31, 2019
    Reply
  57. Lisa Amaechi said:

    Koko to my knowledge was never given the chance to give birth,That is why koko was allowd to play with kittens i could be wrong.

    October 31, 2019
    Reply
  58. Michael Helin said:

    Koko is a perv 😀

    October 31, 2019
    Reply
  59. R Pigeon FabNayNay said:

    My chihuahua, Missy, understands just about everything I tell her! If I tell her to go get her chewy, she gets her rawhide chewy. If I tell her to go get her toy, she gets a toy! It really is amazing how well they understand us!

    October 31, 2019
    Reply
  60. Sir Alda said:

    The Foto at 6.56 is my hometown😀

    November 1, 2019
    Reply
  61. Nathan Barnes said:

    Rico's a good monster boy!!!!

    November 1, 2019
    Reply
  62. Saber SMAW said:

    Well our pet does, it also depends on how you feed them, if ya feed them the kibble from a bag most likely they know what ya saying an understand but not as well as a dog who is fed meat and veggies and cheese which helps the brain grow and understand!
    Heck she even has a personality of her own and she shows it often!

    November 1, 2019
    Reply
  63. Maitland Jones said:

    Humans: teach gorilla sign language
    Gorilla: Show me your tits!

    November 2, 2019
    Reply
  64. xCaptain FSx said:

    I'm already chaser

    November 2, 2019
    Reply
  65. TheVeganBerkeleyBeauty said:

    Why the hell did they take CoCo’s baby away?!?!?

    November 2, 2019
    Reply
  66. Scoot said:

    the thumbnail is the same picture for mortis ghosts twitter profile and i love it

    November 3, 2019
    Reply
  67. Le nearsighted Wandering trader said:

    0:43 before I play the video, didn't a gorilla learn sign language before?

    November 3, 2019
    Reply
  68. la la said:

    What language do animals think in

    November 3, 2019
    Reply
  69. Lexi Lala said:

    Hans at least has better perception of human expression that me, even if he can't do maths.

    November 3, 2019
    Reply
  70. Christian Edwards said:

    Can animals understand humans?
    I think so, the big fur babies we have seem to have no problems understanding the words "Dinner" and "Food."
    And if I say "Who's there?" They head straight to the door.

    November 3, 2019
    Reply
  71. D B said:

    and yet i find this oddly applicable during tests of all things where usually if your unsure of something during a test you can ask the teacher to clarify the question. in which since its now set up just like the experiment with the horse. you can ask the teacher individual questions explaining your thought process behind each possible answer and watching carefully at the teachers non verbal response ques to get an answer without them telling you or even them knowing they gave it away. guess the only restriction to this is timed tests.

    November 3, 2019
    Reply
  72. WXKFA said:

    operant conditioning… all these complicated words that just translate to "action and reward", cause and effect and then you go blabbering about that "that is not how human brain works, creatures don't understand words in deeper level.." well that applies to most humans as well, excluding some etymologists and linguistics… well, then tell me how human brain works mr. scientist so that I can finally build an AI.. no? of course you don't know how it works so how can you be so retarded to even begin to question that them understanding words is "not actually understanding words even if it seems like it" hell, most people who hear new words don't bother to google them, they just go ahead and use them in appropriate context without ever understanding the deeper meaning. people even make fun of other people, especially foreigners, this way. condensending view.

    November 3, 2019
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  73. Derek Rethman said:

    I only clicked on the video for the sciency boi doggo

    November 3, 2019
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  74. Theresa Morley said:

    That horse that could do math was smarter than me when I was in third grade

    November 3, 2019
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  75. Andew Housley said:

    being able to read small social cues makes that horse a genius, because most modern people cant. imagine if annoying people could actually pick up that you don't want to talk to them your just stuck in line at McDonald's

    November 3, 2019
    Reply
  76. lstan mulaudzi said:

    😅 11:01 wait what!?

    November 4, 2019
    Reply
  77. N'gis Stemeveiche said:

    "This is an actual recording of Noc imitating human speech"

    *Balloon starts deflating from a small passage*

    November 4, 2019
    Reply
  78. German Shepherd Person said:

    This horse is even smarter than I am

    November 4, 2019
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  79. pulesjet said:

    Any one who doesn't understand that dogs actually understand you should never keep dogs. My dogs are running on about a 3-5 year olds mentality. Guessing they have like a 20 or more word vocabulary at hand. Yes they Understand me. Dogs have vary readable facial expressions as well . All three dogs present, asked WHO CHIT on the floor. The guilty party makes it more then clear. LOL

    November 4, 2019
    Reply
  80. Joe Murray said:

    How did he remember 93% of 10 toys?

    November 4, 2019
    Reply
  81. Charlotte Dickie said:

    All your pets are Imbeciles: my cat turns her head 0.00000001 degrees when I call her name

    November 4, 2019
    Reply
  82. Elite GamingWolf said:

    yes they can, my dogs catch on to everything and understand some words. mostly because one of them are nosy and spy on me alot

    November 4, 2019
    Reply
  83. Carina Grajales said:

    I knew I wasn’t crazy! My pets understand me. 😀

    November 5, 2019
    Reply
  84. Ethan Robledo said:

    Are you sure it’s not NØKK

    November 6, 2019
    Reply
  85. Michael S Bearre said:

    why do humans think that everything which isn't a human is stupid?

    November 6, 2019
    Reply
  86. Ryan Higgins said:

    Four years later and I still jumped up to grab daddy a beer

    November 6, 2019
    Reply
  87. pancake fox said:

    When i mention truck, keys, or anything related to motor vehicles he takes off to the door ready to go for a ride

    November 7, 2019
    Reply
  88. monkeynumber nine said:

    Do a video about parrots 😃
    Please 💞

    November 7, 2019
    Reply
  89. Coolwoobyër said:

    we are also trained to react to words, but in such a complicated way that it feels like you 'understand'
    Understanding is just knowing how to react to cernain things.

    November 7, 2019
    Reply
  90. Jack Dare said:

    Wow, so you're saying it's even MORE amazing.. animals read our THOUGHTS?!?

    November 7, 2019
    Reply
  91. Michael Red Sox said:

    Cats only interested in themselves. What a surprise!

    November 7, 2019
    Reply
  92. morow Damien said:

    animal are not your property, die

    November 8, 2019
    Reply
  93. Jumpercable wireless said:

    You have a lazy eye, your left eye is lazy

    November 9, 2019
    Reply
  94. Shaman said:

    Anyone with a semi-intelligent dog or a cat they've actually trained with commands doesn't even need to watch this. Of course they can. In fact humans are the only ones that seem to have difficulty reading body language or understanding clear verbal information.

    EDIT: God damn, not even 30 seconds in and I had to stop. My dog is a Rhodesian Ridgeback/pitbull mix, he gets sad when I'm sad, he gets sad and apologetic when he ruins something of mine or shits in the house, he shows gratitude when I tell him he's good (usually expressed through a corrected posture or the classic, licking me) and has a visibly sad look in his eyes before putting his head down when I say he's bad, when I ask him a question he tilts his head, realizes what I've said, and reacts accordingly. When I say vet, he gets nervous and avoids me because they had to shove a stick up his butt one time. When I say to my friend's house, or my roommate's parents' house who has dogs he loves to play with, he gets so happy and excited he can barely contain himself. Dogs don't just understand simple commands, they understand tones and body language better than most humans, so if I'm nervous he'll notice before anyone else and trust my judgement of the situation and be on guard as well. If you don't understand dog body language/how they express themselves, of course you wouldn't be able to tell if they understand anything, you'd just see an animal moving around and sometimes opening their mouth or doing "what looks like smiling" (protip: dogs actually can and do smile).

    If you only have experience with small, dumb dogs, I could maybe see why you'd say so many stupid things within the first 30 seconds, but I was fairly confident everyone knew how smart real canine companions are. My dog watches TV and loves listening to music with me. He's more human than the tweakers in my city.

    November 9, 2019
    Reply
  95. Nahuel Viera said:

    What was the intro song? When the name of the channel popped

    November 9, 2019
    Reply
  96. SystemDemon said:

    Atleast animals have respect for nature…

    November 9, 2019
    Reply
  97. Azzeme Dui said:

    without even watching this video the answer is yes .. i extensively trained a costal carpet python to a point where vocal communication was constant .. and pro-tip.. when a snake learns to communicate & that it can change things by hissing ..that is u show clear response to it, the snake is much less aggressive & will 99% of the time use vocal as the first weapon /warning , i was able to get her to count up to 5 , getting her to hiss every time i put a finger up, had a witness 4 that to ..lol got her to stay around her open tank top jungle gym & cargo net, but she would go on little adventures at night .. trained her not to bite .. but accidents do happen ,starteling feeding etc , trained her to come back when she slithered away by softly tapping her on the tail.. & this 1 work all the time, all up she was a little champ & form what iv seen a lot more is/was possible .. the trick is start with a hatchling, give a high ammount of stimulus, repetition, effection, thinking creatively, consistancy & No1 u must respond to them in a positive way. they have to know that they can affect things in a peaceful fassion. i wish i tried flashcards with her, like relating to events, i think she was ready … additionally, i don't think it was out of the sphere of possibility getting her to communicate with another like her , i could use basic finger signal with her like pointing & clicking back to her tank , i wouldnt imagine a combo would have been to difficult 4 her to comprehend, she was a smart little cookie & im 90% sure this can be repeated. & if anyone wants to call me a lier, my question to u is… have u tried?

    November 9, 2019
    Reply
  98. Allen Burt said:

    Maybe Hans was psychic.

    November 9, 2019
    Reply
  99. Gluttony said:

    animals can be smarter than most people think, i just say keep that in mind

    November 10, 2019
    Reply
  100. pro dominatrix said:

    Beluga whale says “get out” and the megeladon came around the corner

    November 10, 2019
    Reply

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